Environmental Defense Fund's Fishery Solutions Center is the leading online resource for science-based information on rights-based management. No single organization in the world has invested more time or resources on rights-based managment or education. Explore a selection of top academic studies, reports and infographics on RBM.

Visit Google Scholar’s page on RBM for additional studies.

  • Compliance with catch limits is vital to the success of a fishery management approach. This cross-cutting analysis of biological impacts of catch shares, by Melnychuk, M. C. et al., shows that these systems result in greater compliance with catch limits than other management strategies.
  • The collapse of fisheries is a serious environmental, economic and social issue. This study, by Costello et al., found that implementation of catch share programs in fisheries can prevent and potentially reverse the global trend toward widespread fisheries collapse.
  • The failure to assess the potential impacts of natural and human activities on marine ecosystems can pose risks to marine biodiversity and impact the ability of these systems to continue to produce the goods and services we depend on. EDF developed the Comprehensive Assessment of Risk to Ecosystems (CARE) model to help fishing communities to identify and rapidly rank threats to marine ecosystems or a species health and productivity, even when few data are available. CARE fills deficits in scientific data with local knowledge. Without an accurate assessment of the risks facing marine ecosystems, managers may spend valuable resources attempting to limit or control the wrong drivers of system change.
  • This paper provides the background for establishing a seafood brand and consumer education program, known as Carteret Catch™ and for creating Community Supported Fisheries (CSFs), a direct marketing arrangement for seafood, first piloted in Carteret County, North Carolina. A social marketing approach was used to facilitate the partnerships and the behavioral changes among fishermen, seafood retailers, restaurant chefs, and the public. These projects have the potential to sustain local fishing communities and the commercial fishing industry and serve as models for other fishing communities in the United States and abroad.
  • This Design Manual is a comprehensive overview and roadmap of catch share design, drawing on hundreds of fisheries in more than 30 countries and expertise from more than 60 fishery experts from around the world. This is Volume 1: A Guide for Managers and Fishermen.
  • This Design Manual is a comprehensive overview and roadmap of catch share design, drawing on hundreds of fisheries in more than 30 countries and expertise from more than 60 fishery experts from around the world. This is Volume 2: Cooperative Catch Shares.
  • This Design Manual is a comprehensive overview and roadmap of catch share design, drawing on hundreds of fisheries in more than 30 countries and expertise from more than 60 fishery experts from around the world. This is Volume 3: Territorial Use Rights For Fishing.
  • Catch shares are used in countries with a wide range of characteristics. This paper identifies and discusses catch share programs in developing countries, highlighting how these programs have been used in many different places and for a variety of fisheries.
  • Biological and ecological sustainability is vital to the success of fishery management approaches. This quantitative analysis, by Essington, T. E., et al., demonstrates that catch shares deliver more stable biomass and catches than other fishery management strategies.
  • Cooperatives are increasingly proposed as solutions for sustainable fisheries management. There is little empirical evidence comparing the actions of cooperative fisheries across a diverse set of environments. This study applies a standardized survey method to collect data from a set of cooperatively managed fisheries from around the globe, documenting their social, economic, and ecological settings as well as the cooperative behaviors in which they engage and the role they play in conservation.

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